Wednesday, October 7, 2009

What's the matter with Sourceforge

Sourceforge used to be my preferred way of sharing and finding software. Sourceforge used to be there always, hosting loads of projects and stuff, some of them good, some bad, some dead, some very active. But many fine projects was there, incluing a big bunch of good MySQL projects, and most of my own projects are hosted there.

Now, Sourceforge has, somehow, turned dead slow. The interface is now nice and inviting, sort of, but some of the old interface is still there. But it is so sloooow. Gosh. Is lauchpad the name of the game, I have seen lauchpad more as a tool for codeveloping software and stuff, but I have hardly looked at it, so I don't know. All I want is a means of sharing my projects. They are so small and insignificant that few are likely to want to step in and work on them with me, so although they are Open Source, I think there are few people reading the source (and maybe that is just as well).

Anyway, I need to look for something else than Sourceforge, because Sourceforge, at least for me, is just a joke now.

Or am I missing something? And if not, what's the best alternative these days?

/Karlsson

7 comments:

Roland Bouman said...

Sourceforge has been slow as long as I know it (which is, say, some 5 years). To me, sourceforge is more like an official statement that your project is open source.

Personally, I like google code. It's dead easy to use, and as long as your repo is less than 100 M (or did they up that already) free. And you get a nice wiki and tracker to go with it all in the same go.

sudheer.s said...

I am using both code.google.com and github.com. Both are blazing fast and nice to use.

Karlsson said...

Thank you both, maybe I should check out google code. Too bad Sourceforge is so slow...

Baron said...

I greatly prefer Google Code, and have moved all of my projects from SF to Google Code. Not only does SF perform slowly, but it is just awkward to use.

Jay said...

I'm quite partial to Launchpad. LP has been a critical instrument in Drizzle's development and community, and I think the interface and the developers who work on it at canonical are awesome.

Plus, LP is, itself, open source :)

-jay

mordred said...

I agree with Jay. I'm using Launchpad for everything now (and have been for a couple of years at this point) I love it and have essentially nothing but good things to say about it.

GN said...

+1 for Launchpad, it's pretty complex and has no wiki, but I'd rather have good project management, forums, etc.